2019 Cadillac ATS V Coupe

 

Cadillac Motor Cars Through the Years

GM Brands

A Pictorial Glimpse of Cadillac Motor Cars

The first Cadillac was introduced in October 1902. a 1903 model. the engine was a10-horsepower, single-cylinder The Cadillac cost around $100, and completely sold out at during is initial introduction at the New York City Automobile Show in 1903 . The first engine for Cadillac featured mechanical overhead valves along with a square bore to stroke ratio. Steering was rack-and-pinion (humm', we use that today) . A first Cadillac innovation was it's special split-core nuts that locked a nut to its thread and did not need lock washers.

Cadillac is the second oldest American automobile brand right behind Buick which holds the number one title. Established during 1902 with the name of Cadillac Automobile Company and subsequently acquired by General Motors in 1909 and during the following 30 years became established as America's foremost luxury automobile brand. Cadillac broke new ground for many automotive accessories which included full electrical systems, clashless syncromesh transmission and the all steel roof. Cadillac developed three engines, of which one of those was the V8 engine which established the standard for American automotive industry.

Cadillac was created from the remnants of the Henry Ford Company. After a dispute between Henry Ford and his financial investors, Ford left the organization together a some of his key partners in March 1902. Ford's money backers William Murphy and Lemuel Bowen brought in architect Henry M. Leland of Leland and Faulconer Manufacturing Company to evaluate the plant and equipment in planning for selling off the organization's assets. Rather, Leland influenced the pair to keep fabricating vehicles utilizing Leland's proven single-cylinder engine. A new organization called the Cadillac Automobile Company was created on August 22, 1902, re-purposing the Henry Ford Company manufacturing plant at Cass St. and Amsterdam Ave. It was named after French voyager Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac, who came from France, and he had likewise founded Detroit in 1701.

Cadillac Videos

The First Cadillac vehicles

Cadillac's first autos, the Runabout and Tonneau, were ready to go in October 1902. They were two-seat horseless carriages featuring a 10 hp (7 kW) single-cylinder engine. They were for all intents and purposes indistinguishable to the 1903 Ford Model A. Numerous sources stated that the first auto rolled off the line on October 17; in the book Henry Leland – Master of Precision, the date is October 20; another reliable source indicates auto number three to have been based on October 16. Cadillac showed the new vehicles at the New York Auto Show in January 1903, where the vehicles awed the crowds enough to accumulate more than 2,000 firm orders. Cadillac's greatest selling point was precision producing, and in this manner, unwavering quality; a Cadillac was essentially a superior made vehicle than its rivals.

"Standard Catalog Of Cadillac 1903-2005, 3RD EDITION" An informative book with all the specification covering all the Cadillac years and models. It is a valuable information resource on any Cadillac model. It is particularly helpful if you buy and sell them.


Antique Cadillacs
1903 Cadillac Model A
1903 Cadillac Model A
1913 Cadillac Model 30
1913 Cadillac Model 30
1923 Cadillac Coupe
1923 Cadillac Coupe
1929 Cadillac 341B Phaeton
1929 Cadillac 341B Phaeton

Cadillac 353-355 Series (1931-1935)

1930 Cadillac
1930 Cadillac
1931 Cadillac 355A Convertible
1931 Cadillac 355A Convertible
1932 Cadillac V16 425B Fleetwood
1932 Cadillac V16 425B Fleetwood
1933 Cadillac V16 Fleetwood Convertible
1933 Cadillac V16 Fleetwood Convertible
1934 Cadillac V16 Convertible Fleetwood
1934 Cadillac V16 Convertible Fleetwood
1934 Cadillac 355D
1934 Cadillac 355D
1935 Cadillac Convertible
1935 Cadillac Convertible

The 353 series was built on a 140-inch wheelbase chassis and was powered by Cadillac's proven 353 cubic-inch V-8 motor that developed 96 horsepower. More than 50 different body styles were available on the 353 chassis.

The Cadillac Series 355 was manufactured by Cadillac from 1931 to 1935. They were 8-cylinder cars, sold in several models: a 2-door club coupe, a 2-door convertible, 4-door convertible, a 4-door sedan a 4-door town car and a 4-door limousine.

Cadillac Full Size

D Platform or D Body - 1936 until 1996

Amid the majority of the twentieth the D-Body was GM's largest and most exclusive automobile platform. The D-body was utilized for the Cadillac Series 85 from 1936 thru 1937, the Cadillac Series 90 from 1936 thru 1940, the Buick Limited from 1936 thru 1942, the Cadillac Series 72 in 1940, the Cadillac Series 67 from 1941 thru 1942, the Cadillac Fleetwood Series 75 from 1936 thru 1976, and the Cadillac Fleetwood Limousine from 1977 thru 1984.

1936 Cadillac 4 door Sedan - Hood ornaments were characterized by a stylized Woman with feathered wings
1936 Cadillac 4 door Sedan

Cadillac Series 70 (1930s-1980s) C Platform

The Cadillac Series 70 (models 70 and 75) is a full-size V8-powered series of cars that were produced by Cadillac from the 1930s through the 1980s. It replaced the 1935 355E as the company's mainstream car just as the much less expensive Series 60 was introduced. The Series 72 and 67 were similar to the Series 75 but the 72 and 67 were produced on a slightly shorter and longer wheelbase respectively. The Series 72 was only produced in 1940 and the Series 67 was only produced in 1941 and 1942. The short wheelbase Series 70 would cease production in 1938, but reappear briefly as the relatively expensive and exclusive Series 70 Eldorado Brougham 4-door hardtop from 1957 to 1958, while the long wheelbase Series 75 would make a final appearance in the 1987 model year.

B Platform

Initially, the B-Platform was utilized for Buick and Oldsmobile vehicles, while the A-platform was utilized for Chevrolet and Oakland, and the C-body and D-body was committed to Cadillac.

The B-Platform was utilized for the Pontiac Streamliner Torpedo and Streamliner, Oldsmobile Series L, Series 70 and Series 88, Buick Special and Century, LaSalle Series 50 and Cadillac Series 60, Series 61 and the Series 63. The B-body turned into GM's base model platform in 1958, when all current Chevrolet items were moved up to the B-body.

The GM B-body was inaugurated in 1926 with the Buick Master Six, and Oldsmobile Model 30, and had no less than 12 major restyling and re-engineering changes

Cadillac Series 60 (1938-1951) B Platform

1939 Cadillac 60 Specia
1939 Cadillac 60 Special
1940 Cadillac
1940 Cadillac
1941 Cadillac 60S
1941 Cadillac 60S
The Cadillac Series 60 was Cadillac's mid-priced entry in the luxury vehicle market when it appeared in 1936. It was replaced by the Series 61 in 1939, but a model that was derived from it, the Sixty Special, continued off and on through 1993. The Series 60 was the brainchild of new Cadillac manager, Nicholas Dreystadt. Debuting in 1936, it filled a gaping price gap between the LaSalles and Series 70 Cadillac models. Initially it rode on a 121.0 inch wheelbase and shared the B body with cars from LaSalle, Buick, and Oldsmobile. This went up to 124.0 inches in 1937-38.

Cadillac Series 61 (1938-1961) B Platform

1941 Cadillac Series 61 Sedan
1941 Cadillac Series 61 Sedan
The Cadillac Series 61 replaced the Series 60/65 (except for the upscale Sixty Special) in Cadillac's 1939 model range. It in turn was replaced by the Series 62 in 1940 only to return to production in model year 1941. Apart from model years 1943–1945 It remained in production through 1951.

C Platform

The C Platform was introduced in 1931 and was utilized until 1984. From no less than 1941, when the B-body followed this same pattern in adapting the C-body's lower and more extensive body styles without running boards, it might be thought of as an extended rendition of the GM B platform. Subsequent to 1984, the platform was supplanted by the GM D platform and produced until 1996.

The C-body was utilized for the Pontiac 24/29 Torpedo, Oldsmobile 90, Buick Roadmaster, Super and 1958 Limited, LaSalle Series 52, and all mid-level Cadillacs' beginning with the Cadillac Series 355.

For the most part the C-Body was for the top of-the-line models of many General Motors divisions including the Oldsmobile 98, Buick Electra, and the base model for numerous Cadillac's including the 6200 Series Calais, 6300 Series de Ville, the 6400 Series Eldorado, the 6000 Series Fleetwood Sixty Special and the Fleetwood Brougham.

LaSalle (1927-1940) C Platform

1927 LaSalle Sport Phaeton
1927 LaSalle Sport Phaeton
1932 LaSalle 340 Sedan
1932 LaSalle 340 Sedan
1935 LaSalle Sedan
1935 LaSalle Sedan
1937 LaSalle 50 Sedan
1937 LaSalle 50 Sedan
1939 LaSalle
1939 LaSalle
1940 LaSalle Special Convertible
1940 LaSalle Special Convertible
LaSalle was an American brand of luxury automobiles manufactured and marketed by General Motors' Cadillac division from 1927 through 1940. Alfred P. Sloan developed the concept for LaSalle and certain other General Motors' marques in order to fill pricing gaps he perceived in the General Motors product portfolio. Sloan created LaSalle as a companion marque for Cadillac. LaSalle automobiles were manufactured by Cadillac, but were priced lower than Cadillac-branded automobiles and were marketed as the second-most prestigious marque in the General Motors portfolio.

By the time the decision was made to drop the LaSalle in 1940, at least three wood and metal mockups had been made for potential 1941 LaSalle models. One was based on the notchback GM C platform which ended up being shared by the Cadillac Series 62, Buick Roadmaster and Super, the Oldsmobile 90 and the Pontiac Custom Torpedo. A second was based on the fastback GM B platform which ended up being shared by the Cadillac Series 61, the Buick Century and Special, the Oldsmobile 70 and the Pontiac Streamliner Torpedo. A third was a modified notchback design, derived from the fastback B-body, but described as "A-body-like", that ended up being used by the Cadillac Series 63.

Cadillac Series 62 (1940-1964) C Platform

1942 Cadillac Convertible
1942 Cadillac Convertible
1946 Cadillac
1946 Cadillac
1947 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible
1947 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible
1948 Cadillac
1948 Cadillac Series 62
1949 Cadillac FastBack
1949 Cadillac FastBack Series 62
1959 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible
1959 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible

The Cadillac Series 62 was produced by Cadillac from 1940 through 1964. Originally designed to replace the entry level Series 65, it became the Cadillac Series 6200 in 1959, and remained that until it was renamed to Cadillac Calais for the 1965 model year. The Series 62 was also marketed as the Sixty-Two and the Series Sixty-Two.

Cadillac DeVille series (1949-2005) C Platform

1950 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1950 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1950 Cadillac
1950 Cadillac
1950 Cadillac
1950 Cadillac
1951 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1951 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1952 Cadillac Convertible
1952 Cadillac Convertible
1953 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1953 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1954 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1954 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1955 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1955 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1956 Cadillac Convertible
1956 Cadillac Convertible
1960 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1960 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1967 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1967 Cadillac Coupe DeVille
1969 Cadillac Deville
1969 Cadillac Deville
1971 Cadillac Coupe Deville
1971 Cadillac Coupe Deville
1972 Cadillac Coupe Deville
1972 Cadillac Coupe Deville
1973 Cadillac Coupe Deville
1973 Cadillac Coupe Deville

The Cadillac DeVille was originally a trim level and later a separate model produced by Cadillac. The first car to bear the name was the 1949 Coupe de Ville, a pillarless two-door hardtop body style with a prestige trim level above that of the Series 62 luxury coupe. The last model to be formally known as a DeVille was the 2005 Cadillac DeVille, a full-size sedan, the largest car in the Cadillac model range at the time. The next year, the DeVille was officially renamed DTS

Cadillac ATS (2013-present)

2013 Cadillac ATS
2013 Cadillac ATS
2019 Cadillac ATS V Coupe
2019 Cadillac ATS V Coupe
The Cadillac ATS is a compact executive 4-door sedan and 2-door coupe manufactured and marketed by Cadillac and developed at the General Motors Technical Center in Warren, Michigan. Cadillac assembles the ATS at the Lansing Grand River Assembly plant in Lansing, Michigan.

The ATS is based on General Motors' Alpha platform and is offered in either rear- or all-wheel drive configurations. The ATS base engine had been a naturally aspirated 2.5-liter I-4 gasoline engine that produces 202 hp, until the 2016 model year. Optional engines include a 2.0-liter turbocharged I-4 gasoline engine that produces 272 hp and a naturally aspirated 3.6-liter V6 gasoline engine that produces 321 hp.

Cadillac CTS (2002-present)

Gen 1 & 2 - Sigma Platform - Gen 3 - Alpha Platform
2011 Cadillac CTS V Sports Coupe has 556 Horsepower and can go from 0-60 in 3.9 Seconds.
2011 Cadillac CTS V Sports Coupe
2019 Cadillac CTS
2019 Cadillac CTS
The CTS, a mid-size luxury car designed, engineered, manufactured and marketed by Cadillac, is now in its third generation. Available at first as a four-door sedan based on the GM Sigma platform. The second generation CTS came in a 4-door sedan, 2-door coupe, and 5-door sport wagon still utilizing the Sigma platform — while the third generation utilized a stretched GM Alpha platform. Variations of the CTS have six times received the Car and Driver 10 Best list and have twice received the Motor Trend Car of the Year award. As of February 2014, the 2014 model was ranked number one among Upscale Midsize Cars by U.S. News and World Report.

Cadillac CT6 (2015-2019)

2016 Cadillac CT6
2016 Cadillac CT6
2019 Cadillac CT6
2019 Cadillac CT6
The Cadillac CT6 (short for Cadillac Touring 6) is a full-size luxury car manufactured by Cadillac. The CT6 was introduced at the 2015 New York International Auto Show and went on sale in the U.S. in March 2016. It is the first car to adopt the brand's revised naming strategy, as well as the first rear-wheel drive full-size Cadillac sedan since the Fleetwood was discontinued in 1996. It is built on a different platform than the smaller CTS and is engineered as a rear-wheel drive vehicle with optional all-wheel drive. In addition to its primary markets of North America and China, the CT6 is also offered in Europe, Korea, Japan, Israel and the Middle East. On November 26, 2018, GM announced the closing of the Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly in June 2019, ending production of the CT6 sedan in the US after the 2019 model year.

Cadillac DTS (2005-2011) G Platform

2006 Cadillac DTS
2006 Cadillac DTS
2011 Cadillac DTS
2011 Cadillac DTS
The DTS (DeVille Touring Sedan) replaced the DeVille as Cadillac's largest luxury automobile for the 2006 model year. This renaming came after new styling conventions set by the previous CTS and STS. The DTS was produced until 2011, when it was supplanted by the XTS. The initial DTS was announced at the 2005 Chicago Auto Show.

Cadillac XTS (2012-present)

2013 Cadillac XTS
2013 Cadillac XTS
2015 Cadillac XTS
2015 Cadillac XTS
The full size Cadillac XTS is based upon an expanded version the Epsilon II platform. It replaced both the Cadillac STS and DTS and is smaller than the DTS however larger than the STS. The XTS comes with either front-wheel drive or all-wheel drive.

Cadillac El Dorado - Ten Generations (1953–2002)

For 1979, the Eldorado was new and trimmer, and shared the chasis of both Buick Riviera and the Oldsmobile Toronado. with a smaller fuel efficient 350 and 368 (5.7 and 6.0 liter) V8' engines replacing the 500 and 425 in (8.2 and 7.0 liter) engines. A diesel 350 was also an option. In 2002 the car was sold under Cadillac ETC (Eldorado Touring Coupe) and ESC (Eldorado Sport Coupe) trim

1957 Cadillac El Dorado
1957 Cadillac El Dorado
1958 Cadillac El Dorado
1958 Cadillac El Dorado
1968 Cadillac El Dorado
1968 Cadillac El Dorado
1970 Cadillac El Dorado
1970 Cadillac El Dorado
1980 Cadillac El Dorado
1980 Cadillac El Dorado

Cadillac Seville - Five Generations (1976-2004)

1976 Cadillac Seville
1976 Cadillac Seville
1977 Cadillac Seville
1977 Cadillac Seville
1985 Cadillac Seville
1985 Cadillac Seville
1990 Cadillac Seville
1990 Cadillac Seville
1992 Cadillac Seville STS
1992 Cadillac Seville STS
2004 Cadillac Seville STS
2004 Cadillac Seville STS

The GM K-body was the car platform designation utilized for the rear wheel drive Cadillac Sevilles 1975 to 1979. Seville was moved to the GM K stage (FWD) platform in 1980, like the GM E stage based Cadillac Eldorado. The Cadillac Seville is a luxury car that was manufactured by Cadillac from 1975 to 2004, as a smaller-sized premium Cadillac. Despite its smaller size, the Seville typically carried the highest price tag among Cadillac's sedan models. It was replaced by the Cadillac STS in 2005.

Cadillac STS (2005-2011)

2005 Cadillac STS
2005 Cadillac STS
2011 Cadillac STS
2011 Cadillac STS
The Cadillac STS (Seville Touring Sedan) is a mid-sized luxury 4-door sedan manufactured and sold by General Motors from 2004 to 2011 for the 2005 to 2011 model years. The STS was the successor to the Cadillac Seville,.[5] which beginning in 1988 was available as an upscale performance-oriented STS (for Seville Touring Sedan) version, and comfort-oriented SLS (for Seville Luxury Sedan). The next year, the STS received Cadillac's then-new Northstar System, including the aluminium DOHC L37 Northstar V8 engine. The STS was Cadillac's highest-priced sedan, falling in size between the mid-size CTS and full-size DTS.

Compact Cadillac

Cadillac Cimarron (1982-1988) J-Body

1982 Cadillac Cimmaron
1982 Cadillac Cimmaron
1987 Cadillac Cimmaron
1987 Cadillac Cimmaron
The Cadillac Cimarron, a front-wheel drive four door compact sedan produced in the 1982-1988 model years — over a solitary generation.

As a rebadged variation of General Motors' J-Body cars, the Cimarron was assembled on the same line as the Buick Skyhawk, Chevrolet Cavalier, Oldsmobile Firenza, and the Pontiac J2000/2000/Sunbird. Overall Cimarron production was 132,499 cars

Cadillac Sports Cars

Cadillac Allanté (1986-1993)

1986 Cadillac Allante
1986 Cadillac Allante
1990 Cadillac Allante
1990 Cadillac Allante
1993 Cadillac Allante
1993 Cadillac Allante
Initially intended as competition to the Mercedes-Benz SL and Jaguar XJS, Allanté highlighted a marginally altered variation of the 4.1 liter V8 utilized across the Cadillac model line.

The Allanté is noted for an unordinary production arrangement, where finished bodies — designed by Pininfarina and built in Italy were shipped 56 at a time in specially equipped Boeing 747s, to the Cadillac Hamtramck Assembly plant in Detroit where they were mated with locally constructed chassis and engines. The costly transportation process was executed as GM had recently shuttered the Fisher Body Plant #18 which had customarily provided bodies for Cadillacs since 1921. This was not the first occasion when that Cadillac chose Pininfarina for body work, they had previously used the Turin-based coachbuilder for the 1959 Eldorado Brougham, and also that for a few unique customs, one-offs, and concept cars.

Cadillac XLR (2004-2009)

2004 Cadillac XLR
2004 Cadillac XLR
2008 Cadillac XLR-V
2008 Cadillac XLR-V
The XLR-V was based on remaining Chevrolet Corvette C5 assemblies due to GM's transition to the C6. Cadillac introduced the XLR at the 2003 Detroit Motor Show and began production in the 2004 model year — foreshadowed by the Evoq concept vehicle. The XLR came out in 2004, and it was pretty cool from the get-go. It had distinctive styling that represented a "new" Cadillac, the Northstar V8 made an impressive 320 horsepower, it had a fairly nice interior and it used a retractable hardtop -- which was a way cool trick back then. Then, in 2006, Cadillac turned things up a bit. Eager to launch its "V" line to garner the same recognition as BMW's M or Mercedes' AMG, Cadillac added a high-performance engine to just about everything -- and the XLR came out especially well. The XLR-V used a supercharged 4.4-liter V8 that made 443 hp and a whopping 414 lb-ft of torque -- good enough for zero to 60 in 4.3 seconds, which is a mean feat considering its heft and standard torque-converter automatic. But the XLR-V had one major flaw: its price. It started around $110,000 and rose even more by the car's final model year of 2009. The result is that very few XLR-V models were sold, though the few that are out there still command surprisingly big money

Cadillac Woodies

Cadillac Woodies

1938 Cadillac Series 75 Woodie
1938 Cadillac Series 75 Woodie
1941 Cadillac Series 61 Estate Wagon
1941 Cadillac Series 61 Estate Wagon
1946 Cadillac Series 61 Woodie
1946 Cadillac Series 61 Estate Wagon
1947 Cadillac Woodie
1947 Cadillac Woodie
1956 Cadillac Woodie
1956 Cadillac Woodie
1941 is the first year of any information on Cadillac Station Wagons. Actor Charles Starrett, a star of western movies, owned a '41 Cadillac Station Wagon built by Coachcraft Ltd of Hollywood. More Woodies

Cadillac SUV

Cadillac Escalade (1999-present)

1999 Cadillac Escalade
1999 Cadillac Escalade
2014 Cadillac Escalade
2014 Cadillac Escalade
2019 Cadillac Escalade
2019 Cadillac Escalade
The Cadillac Escalade is a full-size luxury SUV engineered and manufactured by Cadillac. It was Cadillac's first major entry into the SUV market, and is called an SUV even though it meets all the specifications to be considered a truck. The Escalade was introduced for the 1999 model year in response to competition from the Mercedes-Benz GL-Class and Lexus LX and to Ford's 1998 release of the Lincoln Navigator. The Escalade project went into production only ten months after it was approved. The Escalade is built in Arlington, Texas. The word "escalade" refers to a siege warfare tactic of scaling defensive walls or ramparts with the aid of ladders or siege towers.

Cadillac SRX (2004-2016)

2004 Cadillac XRS
2004 Cadillac SRX
2010 Cadillac XRS
2010 Cadillac SRX
2016 Cadillac XRS
2016 Cadillac SRX
The Cadillac SRX is a compact luxury / D-segment crossover SUV that was produced by Cadillac from 2004 to 2016. The second generation SRX was Cadillac's best selling model in the United States.

Cadillac XT4 (2018-present)

2018 Cadillac XT4
2018 Cadillac XT4
2019 Cadillac XT4
2019 Cadillac XT4
The XT4 (short for Crossover Touring 4) is Cadillac’s second crossover SUV, slotting below the mid-size Cadillac XT5, serving as the luxury equivalent to the Chevrolet Equinox and GMC Terrain. It is the third model to use Cadillac's new alphanumeric naming scheme (after the CT6 and XT5), and the second of three vehicles Cadillac is introducing in the Crossover Touring (XT) series, the third being the mid-sized three rows XT6 that will debut in 2019. It utilizes GM's E2 platform, shared with the Chevrolet Malibu and Buick's Opel Insignia–badged Regal TourX sport wagon. The XT4 is produced at GM's Fairfax, Kansas plant, and went on sale in the fall of 2018 as a 2019 model. The Chinese-market XT4 is manufactured in Shanghai by SAIC-GM.

Cadillac XT5 (2017-present)

2017 Cadillac XT5
2017 Cadillac XT5
2018 Cadillac XT5
2018 Cadillac XT5
2019 Cadillac XT5
2019 Cadillac XT5
The Cadillac XT5 (short for Crossover Touring 5) is a / compact luxury / D-segment crossover SUV manufactured by General Motors. It was introduced at both the Dubai Motor Show and LA Auto Show in November 2015. The XT5 replaced the Cadillac SRX crossover when it was launched in spring 2016. It is the second model to use Cadillac's new alphanumeric naming scheme (after the CT6) and the first in the Crossover Touring (XT) series. The XT5 is manufactured at GM's Spring Hill Manufacturing plant. The Chinese-market XT5 is manufactured in Shanghai by SAIC-GM. The XT5 is currently Cadillac's best selling model in the United States and globally.
Cadillac Utility Coupe

Escalade EXT (2002-2013)

2002 Cadillac Escalade EXT
2002 Cadillac Escalade EXT
2007 Cadillac Escalade EXT
2007 Cadillac Escalade EXT
2013 Cadillac Escalade EXT
2013 Cadillac Escalade EXT
The Escalade EXT sport utility truck (released alongside its twin, the Chevrolet Avalanche) was introduced in 2001 (as a 2002 model) from the Cadillac division of General Motors. It features a "Convert-a-Cab" composite pickup bed that can be expanded into the truck's cab through a bottom-hinged door. Like the Avalanche, the EXT has four full-size doors and seating for five. High-intensity discharge headlights were offered for 2003. The Escalade EXT also appears in the movie, The Matrix Reloaded along with the CTS in product placement ads. All Escalade EXTs were built in Mexico. The EXT models were discontinued after the 2013 model year along with the Avalanche

Cadillac Electric

Cadillac CT6 PHEV (2017-2018)

2018 Cadillac CT6 PHEV
2018 Cadillac CT6 PHEV
A plug-in hybrid variant, the CT6 PHEV, debuted at the 2015 Shanghai Auto Show. The plug-in hybrid uses a similar powertrain as the current Chevrolet Volt (second generation). The powertrain combines a 266 hp, 2.0L turbocharged 4-cylinder direct injected gasoline engine with a two motor, hybrid transmission and a liquid cooled 18.4 kWh lithium-ion battery pack, which is integrated into the car floor as well as an e-CVT.

Cadillac ELR PHEV (2014-2016)

2016 Cadillac ELR PHEV
2016 Cadillac ELR PHEV
The Cadillac ELR is a two-door, four-passenger luxury plug-in hybrid compact coupé manufactured and marketed by Cadillac for model years 2014 and 2016 — with a hiatus for MY 2015. Using a retuned version of the Chevrolet Volt's Voltec EREV drivetrain, the ELR's lithium-ion battery pack delivers an all-electric range of 37–39 miles and a top speed of 106 mph.

Cadillac Concept

Concept

2012 Cadillac Ciel concept 2012 Cadillac Ciel concept
The Ciel features rear suicide doors, and the inside components a smooth wooden dashboard with a straightforward gage look. 'Ciel' is French for "sky"- which is the thing that the planners had as a primary concern when they made the vehicle.

Keep Your Car Looking New

Cadillac Motor Cars Through the Years Reviewed by Gene Wright on . Rating: 5