2019 Lancia Ypsilon

 

Lancia Motor Cars Through the Years


A Glimpse of Lancia Motor Cars Through the Years

Lancia was an Italian automobile manufacturer founded in 1906 by Vincenzo Lancia as Lancia & C.. It became part of the Fiat Group in 1969; the current company, Lancia Automobiles, was established in 2007. The company has a strong rally heritage and is noted for using letters of the Greek alphabet for its model names. Lancia vehicles are no longer sold outside Italy and comprise only the Ypsilon supermini range, as the late Fiat CEO Sergio Marchionne foreshadowed in January 2014 until his death in 2018.

A great book: Lancia Hardcover – June 1, 1981 by Peter Garnier (Author)

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Throughout the years, Fiat has acquired various different automakers: it procured Lancia in 1968, and in 1969, became a Ferrari shareholder, took over Alfa Romeo from the Italian government in 1986, bought Maserati in 1993, and in 2014, became  the total owner of Chrysler Group LLC. Fiat Group presently manufactures twelve brands of vehicles: Abarth, Alfa Romeo, Chrysler, Dodge, Ferrari, Fiat, Fiat Professional, Jeep, Lancia, Maserati, Ram Trucks, and SRT

Lancia Alfa (1908)

1908 Lancia !2 HP 1908 Lancia !2 HP
The Lancia Alfa 12 HP (Tipo 51 originally) was the first car made by Lancia. The car had originally project name "type 51" and was later renamed to Greek alphabet Alfa.

Lancia Beta (1909)

1909 Lancia Beta 15/20 HP 1909 Lancia Beta 15/20 HP
The Lancia Beta 15/20HP (Type 54, Beta) was produced by Lancia in 1909. The 15/20HP replaced the earlier 12HP-Alfa and 18/24HP Dialfa models. Basically the car was a modernized version of the 12HP with the engine displacement enlarged from 2.5 to 3.1 litres (from 28 hp to 34 hp) and the wheelbase increased from 111.0 in to 115.4 in. 150 examples were manufactured before it was replaced by the Gamma-20HP model (type 55) in 1910.

Lancia Gamma (1910)

1910 Lancia Gamma 20 HP 1910 Lancia Gamma 20 HP
The Lancia 20 HP (Tipo 55), later renamed Lancia Gamma, was produced by Lancia during 1910. It was derived from a previous Beta model, now equipped with a bigger engine. In total, 258 units were built. In 1911, the type was superseded by the larger-engined and more powerful Lancia 20-30 HP Delta. The Delta was built with two wheelbases, normal and short. The latter was destined for competition-oriented Corsa models, to be bodied as open two- or three-seaters.

Lancia Delta (1911)

1911 Lancia Delta (Tipo 56) 1911 Lancia Delta (Tipo 56)
The Lancia 20-30 HP (Tipo 56), later renamed Lancia Delta, was produced by Lancia during 1911. The Delta was based on the earlier 20 HP Gamma, with an enlarged engine. 303 Deltas were made in total, before it was replaced by the improved 20-30 HP Epsilon. The Delta was built with two wheelbases, normal and short. The latter was destined for competition-oriented Corsa models, to be bodied as open two- or three-seaters.

Lancia Epsilon (1911-1912)

1912 Lancia Epsilon 1912 Lancia Epsilon
The Lancia 20/30 HP (Tipo 58), later known as Lancia Epsilon, was produced by Lancia between 1911 and 1912. The car was quite similar to the previous 20/30 HP Delta model In total 357 were made.

Lancia Theta (1913-1918)

1913 Lancia Theta Speedster Runabout 1913 Lancia Theta Speedster Runabout
1915 Lancia Theta Speedster Runabout 1915 Lancia Theta Speedster Runabout
1917 Lancia Theta Torpedo 1917 Lancia Theta Torpedo
1918 Lancia Theta Speedster Runabout 1918 Lancia Theta Speedster Runabout
The Lancia Theta (25/35 HP, type 61) was produced between 1913-1918 by Lancia. The car was bigger version of Epsilon model. The car had electrical lights and start motor.

Lancia Kappa (1919-1922)

1919 Lancia Kappa 35 HP Sport Torpedo 1919 Lancia Kappa 35 HP Sport Torpedo
The Lancia Kappa was produced by Lancia between 1919 and 1922. Lancia's first post-war model, it was an updated version of the earlier Theta. 1,810 were made in total, surpassing the Theta as the best-selling Lancia motor car at the time.

Lancia Trikappa (1922-1925)

1922 Lancia Trikappa coupé de ville 1922 Lancia Trikappa coupé de ville
The Lancia Trikappa was produced by Lancia between 1922 and 1925. It was a luxury car, the flagship of Lancia's production. The Trikappa 4.5-litre V8 is notable as the first of Lancia's narrow V engines, a distinguishing feature the manufacturer only abandoned in the 1970s. The car was offered as a bare rolling chassis, as torpedo or 6-seater coupé de ville. In total 847 were manufactured. Lancia had been experimenting with V engines since the First World War, even showcasing a chassis with a narrow V 12-cylinder engine at the 1919 Paris Motor Show. In the end V12 engined cars were estimated to be too expensive to produce and a V8 was used instead.

Lancia Lambda (1922-1931)

1923 Lancia Lambda Torpedo 1923 Lancia Lambda Torpedo
1931 Lancia Lambda
1931 Lancia Lambda
The Lancia Lambda is an innovative automobile produced from 1922 through 1931. It was the first car to feature a load-bearing unitary body, (but without a stressed roof) and it also pioneered the use of an independent suspension (the front sliding pillar with coil springs). Vincenzo Lancia even invented a shock absorber for the car and it had excellent four wheel brakes. Approximately 11,200 Lambdas were produced. Nine versions of the Lambda were built:

Lancia Dilambda (1928-1935)

1928 Lancia Dilambda Coupe 1928 Lancia Dilambda Coupe
1930 Lancia Dilambda 1930 Lancia Dilambda
1931 Lancia Dilambda 1931 Lancia Dilambda
The Lancia Dilambda was produced by Lancia between 1928 and 1935. The car was officially presented in Paris Motor Show in 1929. The car has 4 litre V8 engine with 24 degree V angle.

Lancia Artena (1931-1936),(1940-1942)

1931 Lancia Artena Berlina 1931 Lancia Artena Berlina
1932 Lancia Artena 1932 Lancia Artena
1933 Lancia Artena faux cabriolet 1933 Lancia Artena faux cabriolet
1934 Lancia Artena 1934 Lancia Artena
The Lancia Artena (Tipo 228) was produced by Lancia from 1931 to 1936, and from 1940 to 1942 chiefly for army and government use. It was powered by a 2-litre Lancia V4 engine, while chassis and factory bodies were shared with the more luxurious 2.6-litre V8-engined Lancia Astura. Total production amounted to 5,567 units.

Lancia Astura (1931-1939)

1931 Lancia Astura 230 1931 Lancia Astura 230
1935 Lancia Astura 233 Coupe 1935 Lancia Astura 233 Coupe
1938 Lancia Astura Pinin Farina Cabriolet 1938 Lancia Astura Pinin Farina Cabriolet
1939 Lancia Astura 1939 Lancia Astura
The Lancia Astura was produced by Lancia between 1931 and 1939. Lancia replaced the Lambda model with two models: the four-cylinder Artena and the larger, V8-powered Astura. Both of these models were introduced at the Paris Motor Show in 1931. The Astura chassis was used by various coachbuilders to create coupes, convertibles and sedans.

Lancia Agusta (1933-1936) Small

1933 Lancia Agusta 1933 Lancia Agusta
1934 Lancia Agusta Techno 1934 Lancia Agusta Techno
1935 Lancia Agusta Berlina 1935 Lancia Agusta Berlina
1936 Lancia Agusta Cabrolet 1936 Lancia Agusta Cabrolet
The Lancia Augusta is a small passenger car produced by Lancia between 1933 and 1936. It made its première at the 1932 Paris Motor Show. The car was powered by a 1,196 cc Lancia V4 engine. During the 1920s, Lancia had been known as producers of sports cars and middle sized sedans: the smaller Augusta represented a departure from that tradition, and contributed to a significant growth in Lancia's unit sales during the 1930s.

Lancia Aprilia (1937-1949)

1937 Lancia Aprilia 1937 Lancia Aprilia
1938 Lancia Aprilia Aerodinamica (Pininfarina) 1938 Lancia Aprilia Aerodinamica (Pininfarina)
1940 Lancia Aprilia 2ND Series Cabriolet 1940 Lancia Aprilia 2ND Series Cabriolet
1948 Lancia Aprilla Cabrolet 1948 Lancia Aprilla Cabrolet
Lancia Aprilia (1937–1949) is a family car manufactured by Lancia, one of the first designed using wind tunnel in collaboration with Battista Farina and Politecnico di Torino, achieving a record low drag coefficient of 0.47. The berlinetta aerodinamica was first shown in 1936

Lancia Ardea (1939-1953) Small

1939 Lancia Ardea 1939 Lancia Ardea
1949 Lancia Ardea 1949 Lancia Ardea
1950 Lancia Ardea 1950 Lancia Ardea
1952 Lancia Ardea 1952 Lancia Ardea
The Lancia Ardea was a small family car produced Italian car manufacturer Lancia between 1939 and 1953. Its unusually short hood reportedly contained the smallest V4 engine ever commercialized in a small family car Nearly 23,000 of the Ardeas produced were standard bodied saloons but between 1940 and 1942 approximately 500 Ardeas were manufactured with lengthened bodies and a squared off rear cabin for use in Rome as taxis. After the war more than 8,500 commercial adaptations of the Ardea known as 'furgoncini' (light van versions) and the 'camioncini' (car based light trucks) were also produced.

Lancia Aurelia (1950-1959)

1950 Lancia Aurelia B20 Coupe
1950 Lancia Aurelia B20 Coupe
1952 Lancia Aurelia B52 2000 Coupe
1952 Lancia Aurelia B52 2000 Coupe
1955 Lancia Aurelia B24 Spider
1955 Lancia Aurelia B24 Spider
1959 Lancia Aurelia B20 Coupe
1959 Lancia Aurelia B20 Coupe
The Lancia Aurelia was produced by Lancia from 1950 to the summer of 1959. It is noted for using the first series-production V6 engine. Several body styles were offered: 4-door saloon, 2-door GT coupé (B20), 2-door spider/convertible (B24), and a chassis to be custom bodied by external coachbuilders.

The very first Aurelias were the B10 berlinas (sedans). They used a 1754 cc version of the V6 which produced 56 hp (42 kW). The B21 was released in 1951 with a larger 1991 cc 70 hp (52 kW) engine. A 2-door B20 GT coupé appeared that same year. It had a shorter wheelbase and a Ghia-designed, Pininfarina-built body. The same 1991 cc engine produced 75 hp (56 kW) in the B20. In all, 500 first series Aurelias were produced.

Lancia Appia (1953-1963)

1953 Lancia Appia 1953 Lancia Appia
1960 Lancia Appia GTE Zagato 1960 Lancia Appia GTE Zagato
1961 Lancia Appia Sport 1961 Lancia Appia Sport
1963 Lancia Appia 1963 Lancia Appia
The Lancia Appia was introduced in 1953 by Lancia as a replacement for the Ardea, and which remained in production for ten years. The Appia was the last in a long line of Lancia production cars dating back to the Lancia Lambda (introduced in 1922) to use the famous sliding pillar front suspension. All three series produced had a Lancia V4 engine of 1089 cc.

Lancia Flaminia (1957-1970)

1957 Lancia Flaminia
1957 Lancia Flaminia
1959 Lancia Flaminia
1959 Lancia Flaminia
1961 Lancia Flaminia Sport by Zagato
1961 Lancia Flaminia Sport by Zagato
1963 Lancia Flaminia Sport
1963 Lancia Flaminia Sport
The Lancia Flaminia was produced by Lancia from 1957 to 1970. It was Lancia's flagship model at that time, replacing the Aurelia. It was available throughout its lifetime as saloon, coupé and cabriolet. The Flaminia coupé and convertible were coachbuilt cars with bodies from several prestigious Italian coachbuilders. Four "presidential" stretched limousine Flaminias were produced by Pininfarina for use on state occasions.

Lancia Fulvia (1963-1976)

1963 Lancia Fulvia 1963 Lancia Fulvia
1970 Lancia Fulvia 1970 Lancia Fulvia
1975 Lancia Fulvia 1975 Lancia Fulvia
1976 Lancia Fulvia 1976 Lancia Fulvia
The Lancia Fulvia (Tipo 818) was produced by Lancia between 1963 and 1976. Named after Via Fulvia, the Roman road leading from Tortona to Torino, it was introduced at the Geneva Motor Show in 1963 and manufactured in three variants: Berlina 4-door saloon, 2-door Coupé, and Sport, an alternative fastback coupé designed and built by Zagato on the Coupé floorpan.

Lancia Beta (1972-1984)

1973 Lancia Beta 1973 Lancia Beta
1978 Lancia Beta 1978 Lancia Beta
1983 Lancia Beta 1983 Lancia Beta
1984 Lancia Beta 1984 Lancia Beta
The Lancia Beta (Type 828) was an entry-level luxury car produced by Italian car manufacturer Lancia from 1972 to 1984. It was the first new model introduced by Lancia after it had been taken over by Fiat in 1969.

Lancia Montecarlo (1975-1981) Sports

1975 Lancia Beta Montecarlo 1975 Lancia Beta Montecarlo
1978 Lancia Beta Montecarlo 1978 Lancia Beta Montecarlo
1980 Lancia Montecarlo 1980 Lancia Montecarlo
1981 Lancia Montecarlo 1981 Lancia Montecarlo
The Lancia Montecarlo (Type 137) is a Pininfarina-designed mid-engined sports car which was produced by Lancia in Italy from 1975 to 1981. Cars from the first series, which were produced from 1975 to 1978, were known as Lancia Beta Montecarlos and those from the second series, produced from 1980 to 1981, simply as Lancia Montecarlos. In both cases Montecarlo was spelled as one word, unlike Monte Carlo in the Principality of Monaco. Both series were offered in Coupé and Spider versions, the latter featuring a unique roll-back manually operated targa style convertible top. The Spider was sold in the United States as the Lancia Scorpion during 1976 and 1977.

Lancia Trevi (1980-1984)

1980 Lancia Trevi 1980 Lancia Trevi
1982 Lancia Trevi 1982 Lancia Trevi
1983 Lancia Trevi 1983 Lancia Trevi
1984 Lancia Trevi 1984 Lancia Trevi
The Lancia Trevi (Type 828), initially marketed as the Lancia Beta Trevi, was a saloon car which was produced between 1980 and 1984. It had transversely mounted in-line four cylinder engines driving the front wheels. Its engines had twin overhead camshafts and electronic ignition. The clutch was a single dry plate with diaphragm and a five-speed gearbox was standard.

Lancia Prisma (1982-1989) Small

1982 Lancia Prisma 1982 Lancia Prisma
1983 Lancia Prisma 1983 Lancia Prisma
1988 Lancia Prisma LX 1988 Lancia Prisma LX
1989 Lancia Prisma 1989 Lancia Prisma
The Lancia Prisma (Tipo 831) was a small family car built by Lancia between 1982 and 1989. It was a saloon version of the first generation Lancia Delta hatchback, and like the Delta it was designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro.

Lancia Thema (1986-2014)

1988 Lancia Thema
1988 Lancia Thema
1989 Lancia Thema
1989 Lancia Thema
2014 Lancia Thema
2014 Lancia Thema
2015 Lancia Thema
2015 Lancia Thema
Starting in the 2011 model year and ending in early 2014, the Chrysler 300C was sold in Europe's left hand drive markets as the Lancia Thema, and as a right hand drive Chrysler 300C in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

Lancia Dedra (1989-1999) Compact

1989 Lancia Dedra 1989 Lancia Dedra
1995 Lancia Dedra 1995 Lancia Dedra
1997 Lancia Dedra 1997 Lancia Dedra
1998 Lancia Dedra 1998 Lancia Dedra
The Lancia Dedra (Type 835) is a compact executive car produced by the Italian automaker Lancia from 1989 to 1999. It was initially designed to support, and later to replace, the Prisma that, six years after its launch, was having difficulties to keep in pace with its latest opponents. It can be considered as the saloon version of the second generation Delta, that was launched four years later, in 1993.

Lancia Lybra (1998-2005) Compact

1999 Lancia Lybra 1999 Lancia Lybra
2002 Lancia Lybra 2002 Lancia Lybra
2004 Lancia Lybra 2004 Lancia Lybra
2005 Lancia Lybra 2005 Lancia Lybra
The Lancia Lybra (Type 839) was a compact executive car produced by Italian Fiat Auto's premium marque Lancia between 1998 and 2005. Based on Alfa Romeo 156 floorpan, with different suspension setup it replaced the Dedra within Lancia's lineup, and was similarly as low-profile as its predecessor, rather than as popular as its Alfa sibling. Just like the Dedra, the Lybra was available as both a Berlina (saloon) and Station Wagon (estate). Around 165,000 units were made.

Lancia Flavia (2012-2014) Mid Size

2012 Lancia Flavia 2012 Lancia Flavia
2013 Lancia Flavia 2013 Lancia Flavia
2014 Lancia Flavia 2014 Lancia Flavia
In Europe between 2012 and 2014, the 200 Convertible was a rebranded Chrysler 200 and marketed under the Italian Lancia marque. The Lancia Flavia was only available in left-hand drive markets, and was not sold in the United Kingdom or Ireland. Chrysler discontinued exports in September 2013.

Lancia Suv's

Lancia Voyager (2007-2015)

2011 Lancia Voyager
2011 Lancia Voyager
2012 Lancia Voyager
2012 Lancia Voyager
2014 Lancia Voyager
2014 Lancia Voyager
2016 Lancia Voyager
2016 Lancia Voyager
Chrysler Voyagers sold in continental Europe were rebranded as the Lancia Voyager.

Lancia Supermini

Lancia Ypsilon (1995-present) Supermini

1996 Lancia Ypsilon
1996 Lancia Ypsilon
2013 Lancia Ypsilon Elfantino
2013 Lancia Ypsilon Elfantino
2016 Lancia Ypsilon
2016 Lancia Ypsilon
2018 Lancia Ypsilon
2018 Lancia Ypsilon
2019 Lancia Ypsilon
2019 Lancia Ypsilon
The Lancia Ypsilon is a supermini manufactured by Lancia, and is the marque's sole product offered for commercial sale. The Ypsilon was first released in 1995. It is the replacement of the Y10 and is larger and more expensive. Between 1995 and 2005 Lancia produced more than 870,000 Ypsilons in the Melfi plant in the Potenza region.

The third generation Ypsilon was sold as the Chrysler Ypsilon in the United Kingdom, Ireland and Japan. In March 2015, Fiat Group announced that in 2017, the Chrysler brand would be discontinued in the United Kingdom, where the Ypsilon sold only 2,000 units in 2014. It is also no longer sold in Japan. With the discontinuation of both the Lancia Voyager and Lancia Thema branding on Chrysler-built vehicles in 2015, the Ypsilon is the sole commercial offering from Lancia, and it is available mainly in the domestic Italian market.

Get Your Very Own Lancia Scale Models
1955 Lancia D50 Scale Model Shown
1955 Lancia D50 Scale Model Shown
  • Approx. 7-1/2" Long
  • Scaled replicas of cars and trucks
  • Die-cast metal body with plastic details
  • Opening doors on all - some with opening hoods and trunks
  • Detailed chassis
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    Lancia Motor Cars Through the Years Reviewed by Gene Wright on . Rating: 5