1954 Oldsmobile F88 Concept

 

Oldsmobile Motor Cars Through the Years

GM Brands


A Pictorial Look at Oldsmobile from 1897 to 2004

Oldsmobile was an American automobile brand produced by General Motors for most of its existence. In 1897, Olds Motor Vehicle Co. was established by Ransom E. Olds. During its 107-year history, it built 35.2 million autos, including no less than 14 million manufactured at its Lansing, Michigan industrial facility. When it was eliminated in 2004, Oldsmobile was the oldest surviving American vehicle marque, and one of the oldest on the planet, after Daimler, Peugeot and Tatra. Despite the fact that it was shut in 2004, regardless it remains an active General Motors Corporation trademark. The Oldsmobile division closing came prior to a larger GM brands consolidation and discontinuation of models amid the organization's bankruptcy reorganization in 2009.

The 1910 Limited Touring Oldsmobile was a high point for the organization. Riding on 42-inch wheels, and outfitted with factory "white" tires, the Limited was the preeminent vehicle in Oldsmobile's two model lineup. The retail price of the Limited was $4,600, a sum greater than the cost of a new, no nonsense three bedroom home. Purchasers got goatskin upholstery, a 60 hp 707 CID straight-six engine, Bosch Magneto starter, running boards and space for five. Options featured a clock, speedometer, and a full glass windshield. A limousine model was offered at $5,800. While Oldsmobile sold only 725 Limiteds' during its three years of production, the auto is best associated with winning a race against the renowned worldwide twentieth Century Limited train, an occasion immortalized in the William Hardner Foster, Setting the Pace.

Oldsmobiles were first built by the Olds Motor Vehicle Co. plant in Lansing, Michigan, an organization established by Ransom E. Olds in 1897. The organization delivered 425 autos in 1901, making it the first high-volume gas powered vehicle maker. (Electric auto makers, for example, Columbia Electric and steam controlled auto producers, for example, Locomobile had higher volumes a couple of years prior). Oldsmobile became the top selling auto organization in the United States for a couple of years around 1903-04. Ransom Olds left the organization in 1904 over a dispute and founded the REO Motor Car Company. The last Curved Dash Oldsmobile was delivered in 1907. General Motors obtained the organization in 1908.

Read the book: Setting the Pace: Oldsmobile's First 100 Years

Oldsmobile Videos

In 1929, as a major aspect of General Motors' companion make program, Oldsmobile announced the higher standard Viking brand, promoted through the Oldsmobile dealer network. Viking was discontinued toward the end of the 1930 model year despite the fact that an additional 353 autos were sold as 1931 models.

In 1937, Oldsmobile was a pioneer in presenting a four-speed semi-automatic transmission labeled the "Automatic Safety Transmission", in spite of the fact that this transmission was really manufactured by Buick, which would market it in its own vehicles in 1938. This transmission included a conventional pedal, which the driver pressed before choosing either "low" or "high" range. In "low," the transmission shifts between first and second gears. Using "high," the transmission shifts among first, third and fourth gears.

Antique Oldsmobiles
1910 Oldsmobile Limited Touring
1910 Oldsmobile Limited Touring
The 1910 Oldsmobile Limited Touring was a high point for the company. Riding atop 42-inch wheels, and equipped with factory "white" tires, the Limited was the prestige model in Oldsmobile's two model lineup. The Limited retailed for US$4,600, an amount greater than the purchase of a new, no-frills three bedroom house. Buyers received goatskin upholstery, a 60 hp (45 kW) 707 CID (11.6 L) straight-six engine, Bosch Magneto starter, running boards and room for five. Options included a speedometer, clock, and a full glass windshield.

Oldsmobile Full Size

Oldsmobile Six and Eight (1926-1938)

1926 Oldsmobile Landau Coupe
1926 Oldsmobile Landau Coupe
1927 Oldsmobile Phaeton
1927 Oldsmobile Phaeton
1928 Oldsmobile Model F
1928 Oldsmobile Model F
1929 Oldsmobile Model F
1929 Oldsmobile Model F
1930 Oldsmobile Convertible
1930 Oldsmobile Convertible
1931 Oldsmobile 4 door Sedan
1931 Oldsmobile 4 door Sedan
1932 Oldsmobile Roadster
1932 Oldsmobile Roadster
1933 Oldsmobile F33 4 Door Touring Sedan
1933 Oldsmobile F33 4 Door Touring Sedan
1934 Oldsmobile Eight Convertible
1934 Oldsmobile Eight Convertible
1935 Oldsmobile Convertible
1935 Oldsmobile Convertible
1936 Oldsmobile Coupe
1936 Oldsmobile Coupe
1937 Oldsmobile Eight 4 Door Sedan
1937 Oldsmobile Eight 4 Door Sedan
1938 Oldsmobile Series F 4 Door Sedan - Oldsmobile Gallery
1938 Oldsmobile Series F 4 Door Sedan
In 1926, the Oldsmobile Six came in five body styles, and ushered in a new GM bodystyle platform called the "GM B platform", shared with Buick products. The GM B platform (also known as GM B body), was General Motors' full-size rear-wheel drive automobile platform

Oldsmobile Series 60, 80, 90 (1939-1948)

1940 Oldsmobile Series 90
1940 Oldsmobile Series 90
1941 Oldsmobile Club Coupe
1941 Oldsmobile Club Coupe
1942 Oldsmobile 66
1942 Oldsmobile 66
1946 Oldsmobile 66
1946 Oldsmobile 66
1947 Oldsmobile Special 66 Woodie
1947 Oldsmobile Special 66 Woodie
1948 Oldsmobile Series 60 Sedan
1948 Oldsmobile Series 60 Sedan
Oldsmobile's 1939 line boasted newly styled bodies in three groups: 115-inch-wheelbase Series 60, new 120-inch Series 70, and the similarly sized eight-cylinder Series 80. The 70 was powered by the 230 six; a 90 bhp 216-cid six drove the 60. Naming guidelines were in flux at Oldsmobile amid the late 1940s. From 1932 through 1938 Oldsmobile featured two series: "F" and "L". Series F featured a straight-6 engine while Series L was a larger body with a straight-8 engine. In 1939, Series F was subsequently renamed Series 60 and Series L became the Series 70 with a straight-6 and the Series 80 featured a straight-8. The Series 60 utilized the GM A-body while both the Series 70 and 80 utilized the B-body. In 1940 Oldsmobile used the considerably larger C-body and only it was powered by the straight-8. So as to separate it from the earlier year's Series 80 it was renamed Series 90 (although there was no Series 80 that year). The series also received names that year. The Series 60 became the Special, Series 70 became the Dynamic, and Series 90 became the Custom Cruiser.

During the 1940 model, Oldsmobile was the first automobile maker to offer a completely automatic transmission, called the "Hydramatic", which offered four forward gears. There was a gas pedal and a brake pedal, but no clutch pedal and the gear selector was on the steering column.

Oldsmobile 70 Series (1939-1950)

1939 Oldsmobile 70 Series 4 Door Sedan
1939 Oldsmobile 70 Series 4 Door Sedan
1940 Oldsmobile 70 Series
1940 Oldsmobile 70 Series
1946 Oldsmobile Series 70
1946 Oldsmobile Series 70
1948 Oldsmobile 70 Series
1948 Oldsmobile 70 Series
Beginning in 1941 and proceeding through 1996, Oldsmobile utilized a two digit model designation. As initially executed, the first digit was the body measure while the second speaks to the number of cylinders. Body sizes were numbered 6, 7, 8, and 9, with six-and eight-cylinder engines offered. Subsequently, Oldsmobiles were named "66" through "98".

Oldsmobile entered the 1950s after a divisional image campaign fixated on its "Rocket" engines and its autosmobile' appearance went with the same pattern. Oldsmobile's Rocket V8 engine was performance leader, by and large considered the fastest vehicles available and by the mid-1950s their styling became among the first to provide a wide, "open throat" grille, suggestive of jet propulsion. Oldsmobile embraced a ringed-globe insignia to accent what advertisers felt was a universal appeal. All through the 1950s, the brand utilized twin jet pod styled taillights as a gesture to its "Rocket" theme. Oldsmobile was one of the first of General Motors' divisions to gain a true hardtop in 1950 labeled the "Holiday Coupe", Buick's version was known as the "Riviera", and Cadillac got the "Coupe DeVille", and it was likewise among the first of the divisions (alongside Buick and Cadillac) to get a wraparound windshield, a trend that in the long run every American make would share at some point somewhere around 1953 and 1964. New for 1954 on 98 cars and convertible ( Starfire ) was the front and back "sweep cut" fender styling which would not appear on a Chevrolet until 1956 and on a Pontiac in 1957.

In the 1950s the classification changed once more, and trim levels likewise got names that were then associated with the model numbers. This beget the Oldsmobile 88 developing as base model Dynamic 88 and the highline Super 88. Additional full-size model names incorporated the "Holiday" utilized on hardtops, and "Fiesta" utilized on its station wagons. At the point when the 88 was displaced in 1999 (with a Fiftieth Anniversary Model), its length of service was the longest lived model name utilized on American autos after the Chrysler New Yorker. Mid-1955 additionally observed the introduction of a four-door Holiday pillarless hardtop, the industry's first (alongside Buick).

Oldsmobile 88 - ten generations (1949-1999)

1949 Oldsmobile 88 Coupe
1949 Oldsmobile 88 Coupe
1950 Oldsmobile 88 Coupe
1950 Oldsmobile 88 Coupe
1950 Oldsmobile 88 Coupe
1950 Oldsmobile 88 Coupe
1951 Oldsmobile 88 Coupe
1951 Oldsmobile 88 Coupe
1952 Oldsmobile 88 Sedan
1952 Oldsmobile 88 Sedan
1953 Oldsmobile 88 2 Door Hardtop
1953 Oldsmobile 88 2 Door Hardtop
1955 Oldsmobile 88 Sedan
1955 Oldsmobile 88 Sedan
1956 Oldsmobile Super 88 - Oldsmobile Gallery
1956 Oldsmobile Super 88
1956 Oldsmobile Super 88 - Oldsmobile Gallery
1956 Oldsmobile Super 88
1956 Oldsmobile Super 88 - Oldsmobile Gallery
1956 Oldsmobile Super 88
1956 Oldsmobile Holiday 88 - Oldsmobile Gallery
1956 Oldsmobile Holiday 88
1957 Oldsmobile Holiday 88 Hardtop
1957 Oldsmobile Holiday 88 Hardtop
1958 Oldsmobile 88
1958 Oldsmobile 88
1959 Oldsmobile Super 88 2 Door Hardtop
1959 Oldsmobile Super 88 2 Door Hardtop
1999 Oldsmobile 88
1999 Oldsmobile 88
The Oldsmobile 88 (marketed from 1989 on as the Eighty Eight) is a full-size car that was sold and produced by Oldsmobile from 1949 until 1999. From 1950 to 1974 the 88 was the division's top-selling line, particularly the entry-level models such as the 88 and Dynamic 88. The 88 series was also an image leader for Oldsmobile, particularly in the early years (1949–51) when it was one of the best performing automobiles thanks to its relatively small size, light weight and advanced overhead-valve high-compression V8 engine. This engine, originally designed for the larger C-bodied and more luxurious 98 series, also replaced the straight-8 on the smaller B-bodied 78.

With the large, high performance V8, the Oldsmobile 88 is widely considered to be the first muscle car, although this title is disputed. The 88 was introduced in 1949. It was named to go with the existing 76 and 98 models, and was a replacement of the 78 straight-8 in the model lineup. The new auto utilized the same new Futuramic B-platform as the straight-6 76 however it featured new Rocket V8 engine.

Oldsmobile 98 - twelve generations (1941-1996)

1947 Oldsmobile 98
1947 Oldsmobile 98
1948 Oldsmobile 98 Fastback Coupe
1948 Oldsmobile 98 Fastback Coupe
1950 Oldsmobile 98 Futuramic 4 Door - Oldsmobile Gallery
1950 Oldsmobile 98 Futuramic 4 Door
1950 Oldsmobile 98 Town Sedan
1950 Oldsmobile 98 Town Sedan
1951 Oldsmobile 98 Sedan
1951 Oldsmobile 98 Sedan
1952 Oldsmobile 98
1952 Oldsmobile 98
1953 Oldsmobile 98 Convertible
1953 Oldsmobile 98 Convertible
1954 Oldsmobile 98
1954 Oldsmobile 98
1955 Oldsmobile 98
1955 Oldsmobile 98
1956 Oldsmobile 98
1956 Oldsmobile 98
1957 Oldsmobile 98 Convertible
1957 Oldsmobile 98 Convertible
1958 Oldsmobile 98
1958 Oldsmobile 98
1959 Oldsmobile 98 Convertible
1959 Oldsmobile 98 Convertible
1960 Oldsmobile 98 Convertible
1960 Oldsmobile 98 Convertible
1961 Oldsmobile 98
1961 Oldsmobile 98
1962 Oldsmobile 98
1962 Oldsmobile 98
1963 Oldsmobile 98
1963 Oldsmobile 98
1964 Oldsmobile 98 Starfire
1964 Oldsmobile 98 Starfire
1965 Oldsmobile 98
1965 Oldsmobile 98
1966 Oldsmobile 98 Starfire
1966 Oldsmobile 98 Starfire
1967 Oldsmobile 98 Holiday
1967 Oldsmobile 98 Holiday
The Oldsmobile 98 (sometimes spelled Ninety-Eight after 1958) is the full-size flagship model of Oldsmobile that was produced from 1940 until 1996. The name — reflecting a "Series 90" fitted with an 8-cylinder engine — first appeared in 1941 and was used again after American consumer automobile production resumed post-World War II. It was, as it would remain, the division's top-of-the-line model, with lesser Oldsmobiles having lower numbers such as the A-body 66 and 68, and the B-body 76 and 78. The Series 60 was retired in 1949, the same year the Oldsmobile 78 was replaced by the 88. The Oldsmobile 76 was retired after 1950. This left the two remaining number-names to carry on into the 1990s as the bread and butter of the full-size Oldsmobile lineup until the Oldsmobile Regency replaced the 98 in 1997. The 98 shared the same GM C-body  platform with  Buick and Cadillac.

Oldsmobile Regency (1997-1998)

1997 Oldsmobile Regency
1997 Oldsmobile Regency
1998 Oldsmobile Regency
1998 Oldsmobile Regency
After the demise of the Ninety-Eight in 1996, Oldsmobile added the Regency to the 1997 and 1998 lineups, which used the same front fenders and chrome grille as the Ninety-Eight sedan but kept the standard Eighty-Eight body.

Oldsmobile Mid-size

Oldsmobile Cutlass (1961-1999)

1961 Oldsmobile Cutlass
1961 Oldsmobile Cutlass
1962 Oldsmobile Cutlass
1962 Oldsmobile Cutlass
1963 Oldsmobile Cutlass
1963 Oldsmobile Cutlass
1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass
1969 Oldsmobile Cutlass
1980 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme
1980 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme
1999 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme
1999 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme
The Oldsmobile Cutlass was a range of automobiles produced by General Motors' Oldsmobile division between 1961 and 1999. At its introduction, the Cutlass was Oldsmobile's smallest model; it began as a unibody compact car, but saw its greatest success as a body-on-frame intermediate. Oldsmobile Cutlass F-85 (1961–1963), Oldsmobile Cutlass 442 (1968–1971 & 1985–1987), Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme (1967–1997), Oldsmobile Cutlass Salon, Oldsmobile Cutlass Calais (1985–1991), Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera (1982–1996)

Oldsmobile Aurora (1995–2003)

1995 Oldsmobile Aurora
1995 Oldsmobile Aurora
2003 Oldsmobile Aurora
2003 Oldsmobile Aurora
The Oldsmobile Aurora is a mid-size luxury sports sedan made by Oldsmobile from 1994 to 2003. The Aurora rides on the same Cadillac-derived G platform as the two-door Buick Riviera. The Aurora became the high-end sport sedan offered by Oldsmobile, powered by a four-cam, 32-valve 4.0 L V8 supplanting the Oldsmobile Toronado coupe and eventually the Oldsmobile 98, in the lineup. The Aurora offered both a V8- and a V6-powered version in 2001 and 2002 but returned to being V8-only in 2003. It is equipped with a four-speed automatic transmission with performance algorithm shifting. No manual transmission was ever offered on the Aurora.

Oldsmobile Intrigue (1997–2002)

1997 Oldsmobile Intrigue
1997 Oldsmobile Intrigue
2002 Oldsmobile Intrigue
2002 Oldsmobile Intrigue
The Oldsmobile Intrigue is a mid-size sedan that was manufactured from 1997 through 2002 by Oldsmobile. The Intrigue's design cues were first seen in 1995 with the Oldsmobile Antares concept car, being unveiled in production form in January 1996 at the North American International Auto Show. The Intrigue was the first casualty in the phase-out process of Oldsmobile.

Oldsmobile Alero (1998–2004)

2004 Oldsmobile Aler
1998 Oldsmobile Alero
2004 Oldsmobile Aler
2004 Oldsmobile Alero
The Oldsmobile Alero was a mid-size car that was produced by General Motors for its Oldsmobile division from 1999 to 2004. The Alero was introduced in 1998 as a 1999 model to replace the entry-level Achieva and Cutlass, and went into production in April 1998. All Aleros were built in the United States at Lansing, Michigan. The Alero was the last model Oldsmobile built.

In the 1960s Oldsmobile's position amongst Pontiac and Buick in GM's pecking order started to break down. Outstanding accomplishments incorporated the presentation of the first engine with a turbocharger in 1962 (the Turbo Jetfire), the first front-wheel drive auto manufactured in the U.S. (the 1966 Toronado), the Vista Cruiser station wagon (distinguished for its rooftop glass), and the upscale 442 muscle auto. Oldsmobile briefly utilized the "Jetstar 88" (1964–1966) and Delmont 88 (1967–1968) names on its least costly full size models in the 1960s.

1970s / 1980s Oldsmobiles

Oldsmobile sales in the 1970s and 1980s (reached unsurpassed high of 1,066,122 in 1985) in light of popular, designs positive critic reviews, and the apparent quality and unwavering reliability of the Rocket V8 engine, with the Cutlass series becoming the North America best selling car by 1976. At this point, Olds had uprooted Pontiac and Plymouth as the third best selling U.S. brand behind Chevrolet and Ford. In the mid 1980s, model year generation topped one million units on several occasions, a feat only Chevrolet and Ford had accomplished.

Oldsmobile Muscle Cars

Oldsmobile 442 (1964–1980)

1970 Oldsmobile 442
1970 Oldsmobile 442
1972 Oldsmobile 442
1972 Oldsmobile 442
1975 Oldsmobile Cutlass 442
1975 Oldsmobile Cutlass 442
1980 Oldsmobile Cutlass 442
1980 Oldsmobile Cutlass 442
The Oldsmobile 4-4-2 (also known as the 442) is a muscle car produced by Oldsmobile between the 1964 and 1980 model years. Introduced as an option package for US-sold F-85 and Cutlass models, it became a model in its own right from 1968 to 1971, spawned the Hurst/Olds in 1968, then reverted to an option through the mid-1970s. The name was revived in the 1980s on the rear-wheel drive Cutlass Supreme and early 1990s as an option package for the new front-wheel drive Cutlass Calais.

Oldsmobile Personal Luxury

Oldsmobile Toronado (1966–1992)

1966 Oldsmobile Toronado
1966 Oldsmobile Toronado
1970 Oldsmobile Toronado GT
1970 Oldsmobile Toronado GT
1981 Oldsmobile Toronado
1981 Oldsmobile Toronado
1990 Oldsmobile Toronado
1990 Oldsmobile Toronado
The Oldsmobile Toronado is a personal luxury car manufactured and marketed by Oldsmobile from 1966 to 1992 over four generations. The Toronado was noted for its transaxle version of GM's Turbohydramatic transmission, making it the first U.S.-produced front-wheel drive automobile since the demise of the Cord in 1937.

Oldsmobile Compact

Oldsmobile Omega (1973–1984)

1973 Oldsmobile Omega
1973 Oldsmobile Omega
1984 Oldsmobile Omega
1984 Oldsmobile Omega
The Oldsmobile Omega is a compact car that was manufactured and sold from 1973 through 1984 by Oldsmobile. The name omega was used to imply the last, the end, or the ultimate limit of a set, in contrast to alpha, the first letter of the Greek alphabet. There were three generations of Omegas, all being badge-engineered Chevrolet models, and each of the three using one of two GM X platform architectures:

Oldsmobile Firenza (1982–1988)

1983 Oldsmobile Firenza
1983 Oldsmobile Firenza
1988 Oldsmobile Firenza
1988 Oldsmobile Firenza
The Oldsmobile Firenza was a compact car which was produced by Oldsmobile from 1982 to 1988. It was based on the front-wheel drive GM J platform, which was shared with the Buick Skyhawk, Cadillac Cimarron, Chevrolet Cavalier and Pontiac Sunbird. It was not based on the European market Vauxhall Firenza, but on the same platform as the Vauxhall Cavalier Mk 2 / Opel Ascona C.

Oldsmobile Achieva (1992–1998)

1992 Oldsmobile Achieva
1992 Oldsmobile Achieva
1995 Oldsmobile Achieva
1995 Oldsmobile Achieva
The Oldsmobile Achieva is a front-wheel drive compact sedan and coupe that was introduced by Oldsmobile for the 1992 model year. The Achieva was based on the GM N-body platform, which it also shared with its siblings the Pontiac Grand Am and Buick Skylark. The Achieva replaced the GM N-body Cutlass Calais after the Calais' final 1991 model year, and ended production after the 1998 model year.

Oldsmobile Woodies

Oldsmobile Woodies

1940 Oldsmobile Series 70 Woodie
1940 Oldsmobile Series 70 Woodie
1947 Oldsmobile Special 66 Woodie
1947 Oldsmobile Special 66 Woodie
1948 Oldsmobile Series 60 Woodie
1948 Oldsmobile Series 60 Woodie
1949 Oldsmobile Woodie
1949 Oldsmobile Woodie
1950 Oldsmobile 88 Woodie
1950 Oldsmobile 88 Woodie
Those wanting a station wagon from Oldsmobile during the 1940 model year had but a single choice: Purchase the base, Special series wagon, built on a 116-inch wheelbase.

Though the Special and Dynamic series models shared a 230-cu.in. inline six-cylinder engine, the latter models rode on a longer 120-inch wheelbase. Available body styles in the Dynamic range included four two-doors (convertible, business coupe, club coupe and sedan), and a single four-door in a sedan body style. Those wanting a wagon on the longer wheelbase platform had just one option: Buy a Dynamic model and ship it off to be rebodied by a company like Waterloo, New York’s, Mid-State Body Company. More Woodies

Oldsmobile SUVs

Oldsmobile Bravada (1991–2004)

1991 Oldsmobile Bravada
1991 Oldsmobile Bravada
2004 Oldsmobile Bravada
2004 Oldsmobile Bravada
The Oldsmobile Bravada is a front-engine, five-door mid-size SUV manufactured and marketed by the Oldsmobile division of General Motors — across three generations and as a rebadged variant of the Chevrolet Blazer, Buick Rainier, and Saab 9-7X. It was the only SUV manufactured or marketed by Oldsmobile. The first generation (1991–1994) and second-generation (1996–2001) used the GMT330 platform, and the third generation (2002-2004) used the GMT360 platform. The third generation was the only version offered in Canada.

Oldsmobile Vans

Oldsmobile Silhouette (1990–2004)

1990 Oldsmobile Silohouette
1990 Oldsmobile Silohouette
2004 Oldsmobile Silohouette
2004 Oldsmobile Silohouette
The Oldsmobile Silhouette is a minivan that was made by General Motors. The Oldsmobile Silhouette was discontinued as a direct result of General Motors discontinuing the Oldsmobile brand in 2004. The Silhouette was replaced by the Buick Terraza in 2005.
Oldsmobile Concept

Oldsmobile F88 (1954)

1954 Oldsmobile F88 Concept
1954 Oldsmobile F88 Concept
The Oldsmobile F-88 was a dream car created by Oldsmobile in 1954, with initial sketches made by Bill Lange. It used the chassis of the Chevrolet Corvette and shared its 102 inch wheelbase. Like the Corvette, and the Pontiac Bonneville Special, the F-88's body was fiberglass. The car used a 324 cubic inch Super 88 V8 engine with a four-barrel carburetor with a small, flat air cleaner. The Corvette-derived rear axle had a ratio of 3.55:1. The console was modified from the 1953 Oldsmobile console with a tachometer added and customizing the fascia of the gauges.

Get Your Very Own Oldsmobile Scale Models
1950 Oldsmobile 88 Coupe Scale Model Shown
1950 Oldsmobile 88 Coupe Scale Model Shown
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  • Opening doors on all - some with opening hoods and trunks
  • Detailed chassis
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    Oldsmobile Motor Cars Through the Years Reviewed by Gene Wright on . Rating: 5