2012 Saab 9-4X

 

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Saab Automobile AB was a manufacturer of automobiles that was founded in Sweden in 1945 when its parent company, SAAB AB, began a project to design a small automobile. The first production model, the Saab 92, was launched in 1949. In 1968 the parent company merged with Scania-Vabis, and ten years later the Saab 900 was launched, in time becoming Saab's best-selling model. In the mid-1980s the new Saab 9000 model also appeared. Saab SAAB, an acronym for Svenska Aeroplan Aktiebolaget), is a Swedish car manufacturer owned by Spyker Cars N.V.. It is the exclusive automobile Royal Warrant holder as appointed by the King of Sweden. Since its inception, Saab has been known for innovation, pioneering significant advancements in ergonomics, green technology, safety and turbocharging. Originally the automobile manufacturing division of Swedish Airplane Limited), later known as Saab AB, Saab Automobile was acquired by General Motors in 1990 who sold it to Spyker Cars in 2010. The sale was completed on February 23, 2010. Saab closed in 2012

Saab went bankrupt in December 2011 and was bought by a Chinese-Swedish investment group, National Electric Vehicle Sweden (Nevs), last year. The carmaker will restart production of its 9-3 sedan model at its Trollhattan factory in western Sweden.

Read the book: SAAB Cars: The Complete Story

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Saab 92 (1949-1956)

1949 Saab 92
1949 Saab 92
1950 Saab 92
1950 Saab 92
1955 Saab 92
1955 Saab 92
Saab 92 is the first production automobile from Saab. The design was very aerodynamic for its time, with a drag coefficient (cx or cw) of 0.30. The entire body was stamped out of one piece of sheet metal and then cut to accommodate doors and windows. Full-scale production started December 12, 1949, based on the prototype Ursaab. All of them were of the Deluxe version. A standard version was advertised, but nobody was interested in buying it so no standard versions were produced

Saab 93 (1956-1960)

1956 Saab 93
1956 Saab 93
1958 Saab 93
1958 Saab 93
1960 Saab 93
1960 Saab 93
The Saab 93, pronounced ninety three, is the second production automobile that was manufactured by Saab. Styled by Sixten Sason, it was first presented on December 1, 1955. The 93 was powered by a longitudinally-mounted three-cylinder 748 cc Saab two-stroke engine giving 33 hp (25 kW). The gearbox had three gears, the first unsynchronised. In order to overcome the problems of oil starvation on overrun (engine braking) for the two-stroke engine, a freewheel device was fitted. In 1957, two-point seatbelts were introduced as an option. The 93 was the first Saab to be exported from Sweden, with most exports going to the United States. A Saxomat clutch and a cabrio coach (large cloth sunroof) were available as options.

Saab 94 (1955-1957)

1956 Saab 94 Sonnet
1956 Saab 94 Sonnet
1955 Saab 94 Sonnet
1955 Saab 94 Sonnet
The Saab Sonett, also called the Super Sport or Saab 94, was introduced on 16 March 1956 at Stockholm's Bilsalong (motor show). Featuring a three-cylinder 748 cc two-stroke engine generating 57.5 horsepower (42.9 kW) and a 70 kilograms (150 lb) aluminium box-style chassis from Swedish designer Sixten Sason, the Sonett I was an advanced low-weight 1,323 lb racer based on aircraft design concepts

Saab 95 (1959-1978)

1959 Saab 95
1959 Saab 95
1970 Saab 95
1970 Saab 95
1978 Saab 95
1978 Saab 95
The Saab 95 is a seven-seater, two-door station wagon which was produced by Saab from 1959 to 1978. Initially it was based on the Saab 93 sedan, but the model's development throughout the years followed closely that of the Saab 96 after the 93 was taken off the market in 1960. It was introduced in 1959, but because only 40 were made in 1959, production is often said to have started in 1960.

Saab 96 (1960-1980)

1960 Saab 96
1960 Saab 96
1975 Saab 96
1975 Saab 96
1977 Saab 96
1977 Saab 96
The Saab 96 was manufactured and marketed by Saab from 1960 to January 1980, replacing the 93. The 96 featured aerodynamic two-door bodywork, four passenger seating and at first a two-stroke, three-cylinder engine, later a four-stroke V4.

Saab 99 (1968-1984)

1968 Saab 99
1968 Saab 99
1980 Saab 99 GLI
1980 Saab 99 GLI
1984 Saab 99
1984 Saab 99
The Saab 99 is a compact executive car which was produced by Saab from 1968 to 1984. It was manufactured both in Sweden and Finland. Although Saab engineers liked the company's existing two-stroke engine, it was decided that a four-stroke engine was necessary, and the choice was a 1.7 L (later 1.85 L) engine from Triumph. This was the same Triumph Slant-4 engine used in the Triumph Dolomite, but the Saab version was fitted with a Zenith-Stromberg CD carburetor developed specially for Saab. A run of 48 Saab 99s were equipped with a Triumph Stag V8, but the V8 was later dropped in favor of a turbocharged unit which later powered the 99 Turbo'.

Saab 900 (1978 -1998)

1978 Saab 900 1978 Saab 900
1994 Saab 900 1994 Saab 900
1998 Saab 900 SE Turbo 1998 Saab 900 SE Turbo
The Saab 900 is a compact luxury automobile which was produced by Saab from 1978 until 1998 in two generations. The first generation from 1978 to 1993 is known as the "classic" and the generation from 1994 to 1998 is known as the "new generation". The "classic" Saab 900 was based on the Saab 99 chassis, though with a longer front end to meet U.S. frontal crash regulations. The 900 was produced in 2- and 4-door sedan, and 3- and 5-door hatchback configurations and, from 1986, as a cabriolet (convertible) model.

Saab 9000 (1984 -1998)

1995 Saab 9000 1995 Saab 9000
1997 Saab 9000 1997 Saab 9000
1998 Saab 9000 1998 Saab 9000
The Saab 9000 is an executive car that was produced by the Swedish company Saab from 1984 to 1998. Representing the company's foray into the executive car scene, it was developed as a result of the successes of the turbocharged 99 and 900 models. The 9000 remained in production until it was replaced by the Saab 9-5 in late 1997, although some final cars were produced into 1998'.

Saab 9.3 (1998-2019)

1998 Saab 9.3
1998 Saab 9.3
2000 Saab 9.3
2000 Saab 9.3
2019 Saab 9.3
2019 Saab 9.3
The Saab 9-3 was a compact executive car that was originally developed and manufactured by the Swedish automaker Saab. The 9-3 was first based on the GM2900 platform and subsequently changed to the GM Epsilon platform. Other vehicles using this platform included the Opel Vectra and Cadillac BLS. Saab's last owners, National Electric Vehicle Sweden (NEVS) were assembling the 9-3 sedan (saloon) as Saab's only model.

Saab 9.5 (1998-2019)

1998 Saab 9.5
1998 Saab 9.5
2012 Saab 9.5
2012 Saab 9.5
2019 Saab 9.5
2019 Saab 9.5
The Saab 9-5 is an executive car that was produced by the Swedish automobile maker Saab. The first generation 9-5 was introduced in 1997, for the 1998 model year, as the replacement to the Saab 9000. At the time, the car represented a significant development for the manufacturer. In the United States, the 9-5 was introduced in the spring of 1998, for the 1999 model year.

Saab Crossover

Saab 9.3X (2011-2012)

2010 Saab 9.3X
2010 Saab 9.3X
Lack of development money precludes changes to the metal on the Saab 9-3X, but the new bumpers, side sills, wheel arch covers and round tail pipes are surprisingly successful at giving the 9-3X an identity of its own.

Saab 9.4X (2011-2019)

2012 Saab 9-4x
2012 Saab 9.4X
2019 Saab 9.4X
2019 Saab 9.4X
The Saab 9-4X is a compact luxury crossover SUV that was introduced at the 2010 LA Auto Show 2010. It is based on the all-wheel-drive GM Theta Premium platform, which also forms the basis for the Cadillac SRX. Production of the 9-4X began in 2011 at General Motors' Ramos Arizpe Assembly in Mexico, but stopped before the end of that year due to the bankruptcy of Saab.

Saab Concept

Saab Concept

2006 Saab Aero X Concept
2006 Saab Aero X Concept
Saab Aero-X is a concept car built by Saab, which was unveiled at the 2006 Salon International de l'Auto. It is powered by a 2.8 L twin turbocharged V6 running on pure ethanol that produces 400 hp. 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) was predicted to be 4.9 s and top speed is 158 mph. It has a seven speed manual transmission controlled by paddles on the steering wheel. Like the later Saab Turbo X, the Aero-X has four wheel drive. The doors and windscreen are connected, so instead of using conventional doors or even gull wing doors, it uses a cockpit canopy where the entire top section of the car is opened. This offers the Aero X's driver full 180 degree vision, and also facilitates entry and exit from its low slung cabin. The body is made of carbon fiber.

Get Your Very Own Saab Scale Models
1952 Saab 92B Scale Model Shown
1952 Saab 92B Scale Model Shown
  • Approx. 7-1/2" Long
  • Scaled replicas of cars and trucks
  • Die-cast metal body with plastic details
  • Opening doors on all - some with opening hoods and trunks
  • Detailed chassis
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    Saab Automobiles Reviewed by Gene Wright on . Rating: 5